Sunday, May 31, 2015

RUFF & HiDEF Meetings Report: May 2015

//////  Six folders attended the May 2015 RUFF (Rosamond Upbeat Folding Fanatics) meeting. The May 2015 HiDEF (High-Desert Enthusiastic Folders) meeting was CANCELLED on short notice.

Origamies we folded in May:  (1) Heart from 8.5x11;  (2) Magic Star;  (3) Magic Star Variation;  (4) Twist Fish.


1) Heart from 8.5x11.  Design by Unknown. First learned from Phyllis Snyder, at a WCOG meeting, probably ca 2005. Made from 8.5x11 letter paper. First you Waterbomb one end of the paper, then fold the long rectangle at the bottom in half, long-ways, and so on. I have a diagram made by Terry Hall, as taught by Phyllis Snyder. A very similar design can be found on the "Simply Modern Mom" web page and the "Origami Spirit" web page (this variation has a “pocket” on the back thru which you can string the heart to make a necklace or wall-hanging). There is also a diagram, at:  ploegevd.home.xs4all.nl/diagram-page15.html  which says the model has been published (first ?) in ORU Magazine 8 (03/1995).

Either version can be used to write a letter or note (missive?) before folding the paper into the heart model. They also both have pockets into which other notes or small gifts can be inserted. See other ideas on Leyla Torres’s origamispirit.com.

We folded the Phyllis Snyder version. The photo shows both the back (left) and front (right).



2) Magic Star-Ring & Variation.  First attributed to Robert Neale. Video at Leyla Torres’s Origami Spirit:

It’s made from eight simple modules. The model can be “shaped” into an eight-pointed swirling star or an octagonal, open-centered ring.

A simple variation, by Tung Ken Lam results in a smaller star, showing the back color (a Color Change), in the center. This one doesn’t lend itself to the opening-and-closing action of the original. A diagram for this variation can be found in the British Origami Society (BOS) Convention Book 2007, pg34. The difference is just one additional fold, at the very end, and a slightly different assembly.

Here’s the classic Magic Star, in the Star configuration, using two different colored papers, four red & four green. For a pic of the model in the Ring configuration, see the blog post for Sep 2014.



3) Here’s the Variation with Color Change in the middle. Here both models used two different-colored duo papers, four papers of each color, the back color showing in the center.



4) Twist Fish.  We again folded the ever-entertaining Twist Fish. See the March 2015 Meetings Report for information on this model.

Here are two Twist Fishies with pretty decorations by my friend Annie.



Projected RUFF & HiDEF meeting dates (current as of date of this Report):

     June 2015
Tue, 02 Jun - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 06 Jun - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm

     July 2015
Sat, 04 Jul - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
Tue, 07 Jul - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
     August 2015
Sat, 01 Aug - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
Tue, 04 Aug - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
     September 2015
Tue, 01 Sep - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 05 Sep - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
     October 2015
Sat, 03 Oct - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
Tue, 06 Oct - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
     November 2015
Tue, 03 Nov - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 07 Nov - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
     December 2015
Tue, 01 Dec - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 05 Dec - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm


----- Whoever shows up for these meetings can sit down and fold with me or whoever else is there. I always bring plenty of paper and am always ready to teach various simple-to-intermediate origamies. Others can teach as well, or bring books or diagrams that we can explore together.

----- All are welcome, but preferably ages 8 and up. Persons younger than 8 years old usually (there are always exceptions, you be the judge) have a lot of trouble with origami and don’t enjoy the experience much. Persons under 10 should have an adult helper present to help with folding and provide behavioral guidance (I do not babysit!). Folders also need fairly good close-up vision (or glasses to get you there) and should be comfortable working with their hands.

...Chila --------------------------------------------------------------
Chilagami - I think, therefore I fold; I fold, therefore I am
Folding for Fun in the Mojave Desert
Southern California, USA
chilagami@gmail.com
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Monday, April 20, 2015

RUFF & HiDEF Meetings Report: April 2015

//////  There was no April 2015 RUFF (Rosamond Upbeat Folding Fanatics) meeting. One folder attended the April 2015 HiDEF (High-Desert Enthusiastic Folders) meeting in Lancaster.

Origamies we folded in April:  (1) Pencil Box Duo;  (2) Business Card Star;  (3) Kimono Letterfold;  (4) Twist-Top Gift Box;  (5) F-14 Tomcat.


1) Pencil Box Duo.  Design by Marc Vigo Anglada. No diagram known, but I found a video and template (for 8.5x11 and A4), at:


A really nice pencil box. Make it from a 12” square of scrapbook paper and it will be plenty sturdy for pencils and pens that aren’t unusually long or top-heavy. An intermediate model, but once you get how to do the collapse, it just takes 5-10 minutes to make it.

This one made from 12” scrapbook paper:



2) Business Card Star.  Design by John V Andrisan. Diagram in my personal collection, by Chila Caldera. The diagram is rough and needs some fixing. This model, made from six business cards, is probably intermediate. Mainly because it’s hard to fold the stiff cards very exactly and achieving a star that assembles neatly takes care and patience.

These two I made at the library. The one on the right I made with blank patterned business cards and had a lot of trouble doing the folding neatly. The one on the left I made from paper rectangles that I made by cutting up a sheet of 8.5x11. The paper was easier to work with and the star came out nicer. Practice helps, too. I like to say: “Practice make perfect, or at least better.”



3) Kimono Letterfold.  In 2005, I designed this letterfold, made from an 8.5x11 sheet of letter paper. I also diagrammed it. I have submitted the diagram for inclusion in the Pacific Coast Origami Conference Book for Oct 2015. If it doesn’t get included there, I will put it on my Shared GoogleDrive, after Oct 2015.

Like all letterfolds, you can write on the inside of the paper and then fold it into the origami. Or you can use it as an envelope and insert a small, flat item (note, money, card) inside the central space. I’ve also experimented a bit with pulling the last layer back out and up, and using those flaps to fold other decorative things; cranes, for example.

This one’s made from an 8.5x11 scrapbook paper.



4) Twist-Top Gift Box (aka Flower Box).  Design by Clemente Giusto. Diagram available on-line by Jason Neal:


The folding of this lovely model is easy, but the collapse takes some practice, and usually requires the use of a long slender or flat tool (a chopstick works well) to make the box take the proper shape. If you have or can find a small block or box of the right dimensions, you can put it inside the box area before doing the collapse, then take it out when done. Once the collapse has been accomplished and the edges sharpened, it opens and closes quite easily. Use Duo paper, as a Color Change shows up on top. Duo Scrapbook paper is nice, 8” or 12”.

This one I made at the library is made from a 6” square of patterned Kami. The top of it is begging to be decorated!



Here I show the top pulled apart, so you can get an idea how it “swirls” or twists to close.



5) F-14 Tomcat.  Design by Michael LaFosse. Diagrammed in “Origami Art” (2008, isbn: 978-4-8053-0998-8, pg 125) by Michael G LaFosse and Richard L Alexander.

The LaFosse F-14 (a U.S. Navy fighter jet) is one of my all-time favorites. It’s not that hard to fold, but does require a high degree of accuracy to fold nicely. I also think it’s one of those models that is just “fun to fold”, and has a lot of “wow” power (it never fails to impress).

This one’s made from a black/blue/white snake pattern paper from the Barnes & Noble Animal Prints pack.



Another view.



And the underside. I really like this view of the model. I used to work on airplanes, when I was in the Air Force, and the underside of this model is reminiscent of all the panels and surfaces of a real fighter jet.



Projected RUFF & HiDEF meeting dates (current as of date of this Report):

     May 2015
Sat, 02 May - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
Tue, 05 May - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm

     June 2015
Tue, 02 Jun - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 06 Jun - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
     July 2015
Sat, 04 Jul - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
Tue, 07 Jul - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
     August 2015
Sat, 01 Aug - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
Tue, 04 Aug - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
     September 2015
Tue, 01 Sep - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 05 Sep - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
     October 2015
Sat, 03 Oct - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
Tue, 06 Oct - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
     November 2015
Tue, 03 Nov - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 07 Nov - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
     December 2015
Tue, 01 Dec - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 05 Dec - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm


----- Whoever shows up for these meetings can sit down and fold with me or whoever else is there. I always bring plenty of paper and am always ready to teach various simple-to-intermediate origamies. Others can teach as well, or bring books or diagrams that we can explore together.

----- All are welcome, but preferably ages 8 and up. Persons younger than 8 years old usually (there are always exceptions, you be the judge) have a lot of trouble with origami and don’t enjoy the experience much. Persons under 10 should have an adult helper present to help with folding and provide behavioral guidance (I do not babysit!). Folders also need fairly good close-up vision (or glasses to get you there) and should be comfortable working with their hands.

...Chila --------------------------------------------------------------
Chilagami - I think, therefore I fold; I fold, therefore I am
Folding for Fun in the Mojave Desert
Southern California, USA
chilagami@gmail.com
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sunday, April 19, 2015

RUFF & HiDEF Meetings Report: March 2015

//////  Seven folders attended the March 2015 RUFF (Rosamond Upbeat Folding Fanatics) meeting in Rosamond. Two folders attended the March 2015 HiDEF (High-Desert Enthusiastic Folders) meeting in Lancaster.

Origamies we folded in March:  (1) Simple Picture Frame;  (2) Heart Letterfold;  (3) Tri-fold Envelope;  (4)  Airplanes;  (5) Dahlia;  (6) Heart-in-Hexagon;  (7) Mascot Monkey;  (8) Simple Conch;  (9) Fairy Penguin;  (10) Twist Fish;  (11) Fuse Conch.


1) Simple Picture Frame.  Design is by Michila (Chila) Caldera, 2005. Diagrammed by Chila. Made from a square. It really is a simple fold:

I’ve posted my diagram on my GoogleDocs Share Folder (anyone with the link can view and download):


Affix the photo to the center of the opened-up model, then fold the sides back up, using a bit of glue if you want it to lie flat.



2) Heart Letterfold.  Design by Unknown. Video on-line at: Unknown. I learned this a few months ago, from a video, and now I can’t find any trace of it. Intermediate model. Requires care to make nicely/neatly. Made from a square. You make two Triangle Folds (crease & unfold). Then two opposite Blintzes, then Overblintzes, in turn. After that it gets hard to explain in words.



3) Tri-Fold Envelope.  Design by Unknown. Diagram in various places, but I can’t locate even one right now. This simple envelope or letterfold can hold a folded letter or a card, or you can simply write on the white side of the paper before you fold the envelope, making it a letterfold. You can seal it with a sticker. The photos indicate how it’s made.

Here are the ones we made at the meeting:



And the next two photos indicate how the model is made This one shows the flap opened up:



Here the sides have been pulled apart and you can see how it started, with a Triangle Fold. The sides are created by folding the bottom edge into thirds.



4) Airplanes.  We folded two simple Airplanes. They are made in a similar but not identical way. The smaller one can be made from a square or a magazine page or letter paper. The larger one is best made from 8.5x11 letter paper.

This smaller one was taught by AnnaP. I don’t remember exactly how it was done, but it started out similar to the larger one.



This larger one (photo below) I have seen people fold many times, in different places. It seems to be a “traditional” model in that many people know it, but no one claims to have invented it, that I know of anyway. I’ve never seen a published or on-line diagram for it, but I made a rough sketch that is lying about somewhere in my workroom. It’s simple.

Using letter paper, fold lengthwise, then make an airplane fold. On the “flap” side, fold the entire airplane-folded area down, keeping the point on the centerline and making the crease about 1/4 to 1/2 inch below the bottom of the airplane-folded area. Fold the top “corners” to the middle, angled so only the points touch in the middle. Fold the small triangle at the bottom, up and over the points that meet in the middle, to form a lock. Mountain-fold in half with the lock on the outside and fold the sides down to line up with the crease that extends from the lock.

The model can be made to act like a boomerang by curling the horizontal stabilizers upward and throwing the model, nose up, straight up into the air. The curled horizontal stabs also make the model fly in a stall-fly-stall mode when tossed horizontally away from you.



5) Dahlia.  Design by Hajime Komiya. Diagram by Hajime Komiya (unpublished). It’s made from a four-sided collapse base, then you form and shape the petals. It’s not hard to make and can be done in less than 10 minutes, but the collapse takes some practice. With an added brad in the center and a pin-back on the back, it makes a pretty brooch. This model has been folded at my meetings, several times.

Here’s the three we made at the meeting. You can shape the petals as you like. The one at the top is shaped more like a rosette, the other two more like the dahlia.



6) Heart-in-Hexagon.  Design by Peter Keller. Diagram by Peter Keller. You can find him on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/valleyfolder. He might charge you for the diagram and you’ll probably have to dig around to even find it; I’m not sure how to find it myself, at the moment.

It takes some work and close attention to the diagram to do nicely, but once you “get it”, it’s not hard to do. Best made from duo foil-paper as the finished model shows a Color Change and has several layers, making it wont to pop open.

Here are the models we folded at the meeting. The one on the right was made with foil-paper and you can see that it is better at lying flat.



7) Mascot Monkey.  Design by Tomoko Fuse. Diagram can be found in “Simple Traditional Origami” by Tomoko Fuse (1998, isbn 4-88996-041-4, pg50). A cute, fun model that can be hung from a hook or ledge by its little hands. You can arrange the arms and hands in different configurations. An intermediate model, it starts with a Bird Base, i.e. make a Square Base, then do the Petal Folds front & back.

These monkeys are made from the animal-prints paper that I got from Barnes & Noble last year.



8) Simple Conch.  Design by Jun Maekawa. Diagrammed in “Genuine Origami (2007, isbn 978-4-88996-251-2, pg21).  Elff taught me this model, at HiDEF. A nice model to decorate a card or hang on the wall. It also teaches some geometric principles.

This one’s made from Harmony Paper; nice color gradations.



9) Fairy Penguin.  Design by Shoko Aoyagi. Diagram was on-line but not there in Apr 2015:


This cute model is made from a square plus a much smaller oblong for the beak. If you have googly-eyes, use them, they are perfect for this model. Or you can make your own with a hole-punch.

Two “blind” penguins:



10) Twist Fish.  Design by John Cunliffe. Diagram in “Minigami” by Gay Merrill Gross (2005, isbn 1-55407-091-0, pg62). Simple. A fun model for kids. You can reverse the folds in an early step to have the back-color show on the face; top, bottom, or both. Nice made from a watercolor-pattern paper. These are also fun to decorate; make a school of them!

The one on the left had one of the early folds reversed, so the back-color (in this case, white) shows on half the face.



Projected RUFF & HiDEF meeting dates (current as of date of this Report):

     May 2015
Sat, 02 May - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
Tue, 05 May - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm

     June 2015
Tue, 02 Jun - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 06 Jun - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
     July 2015
Sat, 04 Jul - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
Tue, 07 Jul - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
     August 2015
Sat, 01 Aug - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
Tue, 04 Aug - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
     September 2015
Tue, 01 Sep - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 05 Sep - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
     October 2015
Sat, 03 Oct - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
Tue, 06 Oct - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
     November 2015
Tue, 03 Nov - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 07 Nov - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
     December 2015
Tue, 01 Dec - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 05 Dec - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm


----- Whoever shows up for these meetings can sit down and fold with me or whoever else is there. I always bring plenty of paper and am always ready to teach various simple-to-intermediate origamies. Others can teach as well, or bring books or diagrams that we can explore together.

----- All are welcome, but preferably ages 8 and up. Persons younger than 8 years old usually (there are always exceptions, you be the judge) have a lot of trouble with origami and don’t enjoy the experience much. Persons under 10 should have an adult helper present to help with folding and provide behavioral guidance (I do not babysit!). Folders also need fairly good close-up vision (or glasses to get you there) and should be comfortable working with their hands.

...Chila --------------------------------------------------------------
Chilagami - I think, therefore I fold; I fold, therefore I am
Folding for Fun in the Mojave Desert
Southern California, USA
chilagami@gmail.com
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Saturday, February 14, 2015

RUFF & HiDEF Meetings Report: February 2015

//////  Eight folders attended the February 2015 RUFF (Rosamond Upbeat Folding Fanatics) meeting in Rosamond. There was no February 2015 HiDEF (High-Desert Enthusiastic Folders); the meeting was cancelled on short notice.

Origamies we folded in February: (1) Winged Heart;  (2) Blackface Sheep;  (3) Peace Dove;  (4) Twist Fish.


1) Winged Heart.  Design by Francis Ow. I don’t remember where I learned this model, probably at least 10 years ago, but later I found it in a Francis Ow book. I probably still have that book, but can’t find it now. This one starts out with Cupboard Doors, then you Inside-Reverse the corners on one half of the model, leaving the other half untouched. Then Mountain-Fold the corners of the untouched half to the back, lining the edges up at the bottom. And so on..... The hearts in the photo are standing up, so you can’t see the wings very well. The one in back has the wings folded back to make a better stand. The wing structure also has a pocket into which you can insert a small note or other flat object.



2) Blackface Sheep.  Design by Tony O’Hare (England). Model was diagrammed in Creased Magazine #11, now out of print. Leyla Torres made a video instruction, at origamispirit.com. For the Year of the Sheep, this is the cutest, not-too-hard sheep I was able to find. The classic paper would be black Kami, white on the back. I deem this an intermediate model. It has two steps that are challenging to a non-expert folder, forming and placing the ears, and the final fold that situates the hind feet. Video at:


The ones we made include one made from an animal-print paper. Very nice!



And here are two I made from red/black paper: Blackface Redsheep.



3) Peace Dove.  Design by Alice Gray. I have a diagram in “The Origami Handbook” by Rick Beech (2001, isbn 1-84309-212-3, pg56). Easy to make. Has a nice maneuver to form the tail. The wings can be folded in different ways for different looks.

A video showing how to make the basic model is at:


A passel of Peace Doves.



4) Twist Fish.  Design by John Cunliffe. Diagram in “Minigami” by Gay Merrill Gross (2005, isbn 1-55407-091-0, pg62). Simple. A fun model for kids. You can reverse the folds in an early step to have the back-color show on the face. Nice made from a watercolor-pattern paper.

A school of Twist Fish.



Projected RUFF & HiDEF meeting dates (current as of date of this Report):

     March 2015
*** Tue, 10 Mar - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm (*** MOVED to 2nd Tues)
***Sat, 14 Mar - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm (***MOVED to 2nd Sat)

     April 2015
Sat, 04 Apr - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
***Tue, 07 Apr - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm (***Will probably be CANCELLED)
     May 2015
Tue, 05 May - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 09 May - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
     June 2015
Tue, 02 Jun - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 06 Jun - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
     July 2015
Sat, 04 Jul - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
Tue, 07 Jul - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
     August 2015
Sat, 01 Aug - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
Tue, 04 Aug - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
     September 2015
Tue, 01 Sep - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 05 Sep - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
     October 2015
Sat, 03 Oct - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
Tue, 06 Oct - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
     November 2015
Tue, 03 Nov - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 07 Nov - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
     December 2015
Tue, 01 Dec - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 05 Dec - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm

----- Whoever shows up for these meetings can sit down and fold with me or whoever else is there. I always bring plenty of paper and am always ready to teach various simple-to-intermediate origamies. Others can teach as well, or bring books or diagrams that we can explore together.

----- All are welcome, but preferably ages 8 and up. Persons younger than 8 years old usually (there are always exceptions, you be the judge) have a lot of trouble with origami and don’t enjoy the experience much. Persons under 10 should have an adult helper present to help with folding and provide behavioral guidance (I do not babysit!). Folders also need fairly good close-up vision (or glasses to get you there) and should be comfortable working with their hands.

...Chila --------------------------------------------------------------
Chilagami - I think, therefore I fold; I fold, therefore I am
Folding for Fun in the Mojave Desert
Southern California, USA
chilagami@gmail.com
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Friday, January 30, 2015

RUFF & HiDEF Meetings Report: January 2015

//////  Fifteen folders attended the January 2015 RUFF (Rosamond Upbeat Folding Fanatics) meeting in Rosamond. Three folders attended the January 2015 HiDEF (High-Desert Enthusiastic Folders) meeting in Lancaster.

Origamies we folded in January:  (1) Heart Bookmark;  (2) Six-page Booklet;  (3) Boat Note;  (4) Double-wall Box/Tray;  (5) Penta Saar Star;  (6) Octopus;  (7) Corner Bookmark;  (8) Traditional Drinking Cup;  (9) Simple Letterfold;  (10) Penguin Home;  (11) Traditional Flapping Bird.


1) Heart Bookmark.  Designed by Fumiaki Shingu. Diagram on-line at:


Low-Intermediate model. Requires care to make nicely/neatly. Made from half a square (1x2 rectangle). I used a piece of pink/white kami here.



2) Six-page Booklet.  Design is probably Traditional. This is a simple variation, made from 8.5x11 letter paper. I found a diagram, made and posted by Paula Beardell Krieg (2009), along with lots of other cool stuff to make from paper, at:

bookzoompa.wordpress.com

This booklet requires one cut. The pages are easy to “lay out” in a computer program, print the sheet, fold & cut, voila! A custom booklet or greeting card. We made them from 8.5x11 scrapbook paper.



3) Sailboat Envelope.  Design by Michael LaFosse. Diagram in “Trash Origami” by Michael G LaFosse and Richard L Alexander (2010, pg46). Low-Intermediate model. Features a color-change to highlight the sailboat. The envelope area is rectangular, making it nice for enclosing a business card or greeting card. Here’s the finished model:



And here is a view of it opened up, ready to accept a rectangular card:



4) Double-wall Box/Tray.  Design by David Donahue. Video instruction by David Donahue:


The model can be made from any rectangle, including a square.



5) Penta Saar Star.  We folded this model in December. In January, one folder folded this model from a pentagon, for a five-pointed star. I didn’t get a photo of it, but here’s one from a square, and made from foil:



6) Octopus.  Design by John Szinger. Diagram in “Origami Animal Sculpture” by John Szinger (2014, isbn-978-4-8053-1262-9, pg56). Intermediate model, maybe High-Intermediate. Forming the arms is challenging. You need to use paper with both strength and pliability. Starts with an octagon.

Elff brought this model, which she folded from Szinger’s book. She and I attempted it at the meeting with poor results (by me, anyway). The photo shows the one she brought to the meeting, made from gray letter paper (8.5” square) that she decorated with the colored circles.



Here’s a shot of the bottom of it, yikes! You need patience for this one.



7) Corner Bookmark.  This Simple model was taught by Fran. She learned it from a book, but didn’t have the title or author of the book. The inside flaps make a tight-enough fit that it clings pretty tightly to the corner of the page.



8) Traditional Drinking Cup.  This Simple, traditional model can be used to hold a cold liquid as long as it doesn’t have to hold it for very long, and of course you shouldn’t use tissue-paper to make it. It’s nicely diagrammed in “Simple Traditional Origami” by Tomoko Fuse (1998, isbn 4-88996-041-4, pg14). Kelly taught this model.



9) Simple Letterfold.  Design is Traditional. Diagrammed in several places, including “The Complete Origami Course” by Paul Jackson (1989, isbn-0-8317-2792-6, 1989, pg42). This Simple model is folded from letter paper. Can be mailed; just be sure to get the stamp-corner on the upper right (make the first two corner folds on the upper right and lower left).



10) Penguin Home.  Designed by James. No diagram available. This cute model depicts a little penguin in its “home”. It can also be thought of as an adult penguin enfolding a baby penguin. James, a RUFF attendee, designed and taught this model.



11) Traditional Flapping Bird.  Traditional design. Diagrammed in “The Magic of Origami” by Alice Gray and Kunihiko Kasahara (isbn-0-87040-624-8, pg86). I’ve discussed this model in previous reports. It’s a favorite.



Projected RUFF & HiDEF meeting dates (current as of date of this Report):

     February 2015
Tue, 03 Feb - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 07 Feb - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm

     March 2015
Tue, 03 Mar - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
***Sat, 07 Mar - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm (***May be rescheduled or cancelled)
     April 2015
***Tue, 07 Apr - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm (***Will probably be cancelled)
Sat, 04 Apr - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
     May 2015
Tue, 05 May - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 09 May - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
     June 2015
Tue, 02 Jun - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 06 Jun - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
     July 2015
Tue, 07 Jul - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 04 Jul - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
     August 2015
Tue, 04 Aug - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 01 Aug - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
     September 2015
Tue, 01 Sep - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 05 Sep - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
     October 2015
Tue, 06 Oct - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 03 Oct - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
     November 2015
Tue, 03 Nov - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 07 Nov - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
     December 2015
Tue, 01 Dec - RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Sat, 05 Dec - HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm

----- Whoever shows up for these meetings can sit down and fold with me or whoever else is there. I always bring plenty of paper and am always ready to teach various simple-to-intermediate origamies. Others can teach as well, or bring books or diagrams that we can explore together.

----- All are welcome, but preferably ages 8 and up. Persons younger than 8 years old usually (there are always exceptions, you be the judge) have a lot of trouble with origami and don’t enjoy the experience much. Persons under 10 should have an adult helper present to help with folding and provide behavioral guidance (I do not babysit!). Folders also need fairly good close-up vision (or glasses to get you there) and should be comfortable working with their hands.

...Chila --------------------------------------------------------------
Chilagami - I think, therefore I fold; I fold, therefore I am
Folding for Fun in the Mojave Desert
Southern California, USA
chilagami@gmail.com
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Thursday, January 1, 2015

RUFF & HiDEF Meetings Report: December 2014

//////  Four folders attended the December 2014 RUFF (Rosamond Upbeat Folding Fanatics) meeting in Rosamond. Four folders attended the December 2014 HiDEF (High-Desert Enthusiastic Folders) meeting in Lancaster.

Origamies we folded in December: (1) Kiri-Origami Gift Bow;  (2) Pop Star;  (3) Saar Star;  (4) Fuse Santa;  (5) Santa Claus Gift Box;  (6) Yoshizawa Simple Butterfly.


1) Kiri-Origami Gift Bow.  Design by unknown. This cute bow requires a bit of cutting and a simple sink, but can be made in 5-10 minutes and makes a nice wall or card decoration, or gift bow. Make them small for ultimate cute-ness! See Step Photos at:  http://www.origami-instructions.com/origami-bow.html

We made them from the 6” papers that Barnes & Noble was selling in a 400-sheet book this year, for $8.



Here are more Gift Bows. The pink one is made from glossy origami paper. The red-&-green one has the points folded to the back for a different look.



2) Pop Star.  Design by Traditional. Use Duo paper or two papers back-to-back. Do a Full Blintz, then make a Square Base with flaps on the inside. Make a Bird Base from the Square Base, then “Stretch” the Base to make the model “pop” open. Diagram in “The Magic of Origami” by Alice Gray & Kunihiko Kasahara (isbn 0-87040-634-8, 1977, pg87).

Two Pop Stars, made from the Barnes & Noble Xmas Paper Pack.



Four more. The two at the top used two sheets of paper, placed back-to-back. The two at the bottom used one sheet, showing the white side on the inside.



These three were each made from one square of red-green duo paper.



1) Saar Star.  Design by Endla Saar. Diagram in “The Flapping Bird” by Samuel Randlett (self-published collection of newsletters, 1976, available through OrigamiUSA, pg97) Start with a Bird Base, all points in the up-raised position. Fold them down, but not all the way, leaving a “shoulder” at the top. Fold the corners of the shoulders (two on each of the four sides, eight corners in all) to the back (simple reverse to back). Open the long points out to form the star.

Again, we used the B&N Xmas Paper Pack.



Here’s the back of the model. Not too bad-looking. This model is especially nice made from foil.



And some Saar Stars from the meeting attendees.



1) Simple Santa.  Design is by Tomoko Fuse. Diagram in “Simple Traditional Origami” by Tomoko Fuse (I can’t find my copy right now). Starts with an Airplane Fold. Fold red tip to white tip. Turn over. Fold white tip to the front. Fold sides to back.

Here’s the model as shown in the book.



Here it is with the tip of the hat and the lower corners folded to the back.



Here’s one with a face.



1) Santa Claus Gift Box.  Design by Francesco Mancini. Diagram by F. Mancini and Francesco Decio found on-line. Says “variation of Carmen Sprung’s Hildegard-Schachtel”. Made from two squares, preferably red/white paper. The two folded pieces fit together to make the box. You can squeeze the back of the box to open it and put something inside.

Here’s a quartet of them.



1) Simple Butterfly.  Design by Akira Yoshizawa. I’ve never seen a diagram, but a photo of the model appears, in a photo of a group of Yoshizawa butterflies, in “Make It With Paper” by Paul Jackson and Vivien Frank (isbn 1-55521-803-2, 1992, pg131). Starts with an offset Triangle Fold. This model is best made from same-color Duo paper, and use small paper, 2” or smaller. Doesn’t have to be perfectly square, so tear out a square from any convenient folding material. Nice made from colored tissue wrapping paper; they will look very pretty in a window.

Here are the ones we made at the meeting.


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Scheduled meetings coming up (current as of date of this Report):

        RUFF - Rosamond Library, 5-7pm
Tue, 06 Jan 2015
-----------------------
Tue, 03 Feb 2015
Tue, 03 Mar 2015
Tue, 07 Apr 2015

        HiDEF - Lancaster Library, 1-4pm
Sat, 03 Jan 2015
----------------------
Sat, 07 Feb 2015
Sat, 07 Mar 2015
Sat, 03 Apr 2015

----- Whoever shows up for these meetings can sit down and fold with me or whoever else is there. I always bring plenty of paper and am always ready to teach various simple-to-intermediate origamies. Others can teach as well, or bring books or diagrams that we can explore together.

----- All are welcome, but preferably ages 8 and up. Persons younger than 8 years old usually (there are always exceptions, you be the judge) have a lot of trouble with origami and don’t enjoy the experience much. Persons under 10 should have an adult helper present to help with folding and provide behavioral guidance (I do not babysit!). Folders also need fairly good close-up vision (or glasses to get you there) and should be comfortable working with their hands.

...Chila --------------------------------------------------------------
Chilagami - I think, therefore I fold; I fold, therefore I am
Folding for Fun in the Mojave Desert
Southern California, USA
chilagami@gmail.com
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