Thursday, February 27, 2014

RUFF & HiDEF Meetings Report: February 2014

//////  Six folders attended the February 2014 RUFF (Rosamond Upbeat Folding Fanatics) meeting. Seven folders attended the February 2014 HiDEF (High-Desert Enthusiastic Folders) meeting.

First, I want to notify my readers that I updated some of the entries for January 2014. Go to January’s Report and look for the updates (they are hilighted  with ***).

Origamies we folded in February: 1. Winged Heart // 2. Heart From A Square // 3. Rocking Horse // 4. Horse Head // 5. Cube With Windows // 6. Two-Faced Heart // 7. Traditional Flapping Bird // 8. Gaillardia.
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1. Winged Heart.  Design by Francis Ow. I don’t remember where I learned this model, probably at least 10 years ago, but later I found it in a Francis Ow book. I probably still have that book, but can’t find it now. This one starts out with Cupboard Doors, then you Inside-Reverse the corners on one half of the model, leaving the other half untouched. Then Mountain-Fold the corners of the untouched half to the back, lining the edges up at the bottom. And so on.....
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Here are three Hearts we made with patterned origami paper.
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2. Heart from a Square.  Design by Francis Ow. I learned this model at: happyfolding.com/instructions-ow-love_with_strings_attached. Do a Book Fold, then one Cupboard Door, and roll it over. Make a pinch halfway across long side. Do an Airplane Fold, on the solid side, bringing layered edges to meet on the middle line (white is now showing on this side). Hard to describe after this. I also found an animated cartoon showing a different method, but with very similar result, at: en.origami-club.com/valentine/heart-pendant/anime-heart-pendant/index.html.
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And here’s one showing the back of the model.
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3. Rocking Horse.  Design by Jose Tomas Buitrago. Leyla Torres posted the approved video on origamispirit.com. Starts with a white Square Base. Leyla made a mobile out of them, but they look cute just about anywhere. Happy Chinese Year of the Horse, 2014!
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4. Horse Head.  Design by Leyla Torres. Basically a riff off the Rocking Horse, but a nice one. Makes a nice card decoration or bookmark. Leyla also shows it glued onto a popsicle stick, and stuck into a cupcake for a party decoration.
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5. Cube With Windows.  Design is a variation by Bennett Arnstein, on Decoration Box by Lewis Simon. Diagram can be found in “Beginner’s Book of Modular Origami Polyhedra: The Platonic Solids” by  Rona Gurkewitz & Bennett Arnstein, Dover, 2008, pg24. I learned the model from Bennett in ca 2008. I made one and never made another, until now. The modules are easy and the assembly is mildly challenging. Once completed, the model is very sturdy.
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6. Two-Faced Heart.  A boy (about 13 or 14) dropped by our table at the HiDEF meeting, and watched us folding the Winged Heart; then he produced this Two-Faced Heart on his own, he said. So I credit the design to him, although some aspects of it are reminiscent of a Francis Ow model I've done in the past. It could be a derivation. Need to find my Francis Ow books! Starts with a colored Triangle Base (aka Waterbomb Base) and requires a small tear or cut to create the inside notch of the heart.
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Another look at the Two-Faced Heart, with the front right-side flap folded to the left so you can see the “mechanics” which are hidden on the sides.
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7. Traditional Flapping Bird.  Design is Traditional. Diagram can be found in “The Magic of Origami” by Alice Gray & Kunihiko Kasahara, pg86. This one has the wider neck and tail as compared to the Traditional Flapping Crane. Both models are shown on page 86 of the book. The Traditional Flapping Bird has good flapping action, but it can be uneven and hard to get started. The small “step” on the bottom is important. It can be on the neck side or the tail side, but that step is what creates a comfortable space for the paper to move which allows the wings to move.
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8. Gaillardia.  Design by Meenakshi Mukerji. Video instructions on happyfolding.com, by Sara Adams. I really like this model and I’m very grateful to Sara Adams for featuring it in one of her excellent videos. I have Meenakshi’s book (“Wondrous One Sheet Origami” (2013), pg59), but who knows how long it would have taken me to peruse the book and try this model, it could have been years, if ever. “So many books, so little time!” So, a big “thank you” to Meenakshi and Sara for their generous sharing of their time and efforts with the origami community!
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I found this model hard to make correctly and neatly, but I’ve only done two of them following, exactly, the diagram/video. And I used a 6” square of duo paper, which is a little too small and perhaps too heavy for that size. The book recommends 8” or larger, and I agree, unless you have very thin paper. The portions of the paper that form the petals ends up being several layers thick in some places. My two attempts ended up looking pretty enough, but somewhat lumpy; I can’t get either of them to lay really flat. At least part of the problem seems to be the collapsed “vanes” on the back. Perhaps some glue to flatten them? Or, again, larger or thinner paper. But, yeah, as diagrammed, it’s very pretty and has a sturdiness, or heft, the ones discussed below lack.
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One thing that I had trouble doing neatly was the odd-angled crease made in steps 12 and 13. In the final analysis, it appears to me that the beginning part of that crease (the part closer to the middle of the model) is only there to set the correct angle, while the outer part of the crease is the part you end up using in step 15, to evenly collapse the petals around the octagon. I found in later attempts (see below) that I could make this crease more-easily by just bringing the two adjacent creases together, at the outer edge of the octagonal model (before the collapse), and just crease down to the edge of the middle octagon. This locates the shaping-crease in between the other two creases, which is where it seems to be aimed, in the diagram and the video.
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I already know Wenhau Chao’s ESS (Emma’s Secret Star, which Wenhau says is based on a Carmen Sprung model that I have not yet found any reference to), and I recognized that this model uses essentially the same base, just with variations to get the color-change and a slightly different shape to the petals/star-points (and the face of the Gaillardia is on the opposite side from the face of the ESS). So I tried making several of this model using a base more like the ESS (I skipped the color-change steps and used paper that has a different color in the center, to become the center of the Gaillardia). I found this easier to do successfully, the only con being that you have to choose your paper to get that color-change in the center using only one side of the paper.
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This photo shows the two attempts I made, following *all* the directions as exactly as I could. I used a 6” square which is a bit too small; the paper becomes thick and the collapse and petal-shaping is difficult. But this photo shows the model with the correct color-change which has one side of the paper showing in the middle and the color on the other side of the paper showing in the petal area. My first attempt is on the right, and you can see that the petals did not collapse very evenly, due to the difficulty I had making the shaping-crease as shown in the diagram, and also the thickness of the outer parts of the octagon. Larger (or thinner) paper and more practice would no doubt help!
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Here is a shot of the back of the model, showing the collapsed “vanes”. With this relatively-thick paper, I can’t get the vanes to lie very flat.
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The next photo shows one that I made using the ESS-like method (I’ll call it Gaillardia Variation by Chila or GVC); the paper it’s made from is also shown, so you can see how the pattern on the front side collapsed to show on the face of the Gaillardia; nothing from the back side is visible on the front of the model). I have always had at least some trouble getting the petals (or star points) to collapse in an even and regular way around the octagon, when making the ESS. Using Meenakshi’s idea of putting in that shaping-crease before doing the collapse, makes this easier to do. I did the shaping-crease as described in the third paragraph, above.
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This final photo shows another GVC (ie, made by the ESS method; showing only the front side of the paper). This one shows more clearly the different-colored center of the paper collapsed into the center of the completed model. Again, no part of the back side of the paper is showing in this version of the model.
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I had never heard of this name, Gaillardia, and looked it up and here is what Wikipedia had to say: Gaillardia, or Blanket Flower, is a genus of flowering plants in the sunflower family, Asteraceae, native to North and South America. It was named after M. Gaillard de Merentonneau (or perhaps Charentonneau), an 18th-century French magistrate who was a patron of botany. The common name “blanket flower” may refer to the resemblance of the inflorescence to the brightly patterned blankets made by Native Americans, or to the ability of wild varieties to blanket the ground with colonies. Many cultivars have been bred for ornamental use.
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(My thimble-full of French knowledge, from many years ago, says that the name is probably pronounced either gay-LAR-dia, or gail-YAR-dia.)
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All Photos by Chila Caldera, unless noted otherwise. If you use them, give full credit, for the origami design and the photo. If you use any Diagrams on this page, or pointed to, give full credit to the extent known, for both the design and the diagram; you may share, but not sell, the diagram.
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----- The RUFF meeting for March 2014 will be held at the Rosamond, CA, Library on:
Tuesday, 04 Mar, 5-7pm.
----- The HiDEF meeting for March 2014 will be held at the Lancaster, CA, Library on:
Saturday, 15 Mar, 1-4pm.
----- Whoever shows up for these meetings can sit down and fold with me or whoever else is there. I always bring plenty of paper and am always ready to teach various simple-to-intermediate origamies. Others can teach as well, or bring books or diagrams that we can explore together.
...Chila --------------------------------------------------------------
Chilagami - I think, therefore I fold; I fold, therefore I am
Folding for Fun in the Mojave Desert
Southern California, USA
chilagami@gmail.com
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